Chronic myeloid neoplasms harboring concomitant mutations in myeloproliferative neoplasm driver genes (JAK2/MPL/CALR) and SF3B1.

TitleChronic myeloid neoplasms harboring concomitant mutations in myeloproliferative neoplasm driver genes (JAK2/MPL/CALR) and SF3B1.
Publication TypeJournal Article
Year of Publication2021
AuthorsOk CYoung, Trowell KT, Parker KG, Moser K, Weinberg OK, Rogers HJ, Reichard KK, George TI, Hsi ED, Bueso-Ramos CE, Tam W, Orazi A, Bagg A, Arber DA, Hasserjian RP, Wang SA
JournalMod Pathol
Volume34
Issue1
Pagination20-31
Date Published2021 01
ISSN1530-0285
Abstract

JAK2, CALR, and MPL are myeloproliferative neoplasm (MPN)-driver mutations, whereas SF3B1 is strongly associated with ring sideroblasts (RS) in myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS). Concomitant mutations of SF3B1 and MPN-driver mutations out of the context of MDS/MPN with RS and thrombocytosis (MDS/MPN-RS-T) are not well-studied. From the cases (<5% blasts) tested by NGS panels interrogating at least 42 myeloid neoplasm-related genes, we identified 18 MDS/MPN-RS-T, 42 MPN, 10 MDS, and 6 MDS/MPN-U cases with an SF3B1 and an MPN-driver mutation. Using a 10% VAF difference to define "SF3B1-dominant," "MPN-mutation dominant," and "no dominance," the majority of MDS/MPN-RS-T clustered in "SF3B1-dominant" and "no dominance" regions. Aside from parameters as thrombocytosis and ā‰„15% RS required for RS-T, MDS also differed in frequent neutropenia, multilineage dysplasia, and notably more cases with <10% VAF of MPN-driver mutations (60%, pā€‰=ā€‰0.0346); MPN differed in more frequent splenomegaly, myelofibrosis, and higher VAF of "MPN-driver mutations." "Gray zone" cases with features overlapping MDS/MPN-RS-T were observed in over one-thirds of non-RS-T cases. This study shows that concomitant SF3B1 and MPN-driver mutations can be observed in MDS, MPN, and MDS/MPN-U, each showing overlapping but also distinctively different clinicopathological features. Clonal hierarchy, cytogenetic abnormalities, and additional somatic mutations may in part contribute to different disease phenotypes, which may help in the classification of "gray zone" cases.

DOI10.1038/s41379-020-0624-y
Alternate JournalMod Pathol
PubMed ID32694616
Related Faculty: 
Wayne Tam, M.D., Ph.D.

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