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Dr. Marcin Imielinski Receives Pershing Square Sohn Cancer Research Alliance Award

Marcin Imielinski, MD, PhD
Assistant Professor of Pathology and Laboratory Medicine

The Pershing Square Sohn Cancer Research Alliance today announced the six winners of the 2021 Pershing Square Sohn Prize for Young Investigators in Cancer Research, awarded annually to cancer research scientists and physician-scientists based in the greater New York City area. The Prize, totaling $3.6 million, empowers investigators early in their independent careers to pursue research projects at a critical stage when traditional funding is lacking. Recipients receive $200,000 per year for three years.

Over the past eight years, the Alliance has awarded over $30 million to 52 scientists. With this funding, the recipients have contributed greatly to New York’s growing biomedical research hub. In addition to funding, the Alliance provides Prize winners with opportunities to present their work to scientific and business audiences to encourage collaboration and help bridge the gap between academia and industry.

“We are in awe of the incredible research the scientists have demonstrated, particularly this past year amid such challenging circumstances,” said Pershing Square Foundation Trustee Neri Oxman. “Our commitment to enabling early-stage research remains core to our mission, and we are proud to support this year’s prize winners and their innovative work.”

One of the award winners was Dr. Marcin Imielinski from the Department of Pathology and Laboratory Medicine at Weill Cornell Medicine.

Using innovative methods to characterize structural changes in whole genome sequences, Dr. Imielinski hopes to explain why certain acral melanomas (which occur on the hands and feet) and other similar cancers with few small mutations respond to immunotherapy by examining a novel class of genetic alterations called tyfonas. This study can transform the basic understanding of cancer evolution and provide evidence for a whole genome sequencing immunotherapy biomarker to help navigate the best course for patient treatment.

Source: Business Wire, 5/18/21

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